Movies from My Childhood

Kids Movies

As I mentioned in an earlier Childhood post, my family didn’t own a TV until I was around four years old.  Some of the first movies I remember ever watching were Bambi, the Disney movie, of course; Stagecoach, the first movie John Wayne and John Ford worked together on; and Phar Lap, an Australian movie about a racehorse.

These are other movies that I loved, or remember from childhood…

Animal Movies

The Black Stallion

The Black Stallion Returns

Misty

Black Beauty

Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey

Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco

Beethoven

Free Willy

Iron Will

Milo & Otis

Pete’s Dragon

Born Free

National Velvet

Babe

The Three Lives of Thomasina

Into the West

Where the Red Fern Grows

Animated Movies

The Lion King

Aladdin

The Return of Jafar

101 Dalmatians

The Fox and the Hound

Beauty and the Beast

Thumbelina

Charlotte’s Web

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

The Rescuers

The Rescuers Down Under

The Jungle Book

The Aristocats

Kids Movies

The Parent Trap

Flight of the Navigator

Mary Poppins

The Journey of Natty Gann

Heidi

Toby Tyler, or Ten Weeks with a Circus

Shipwrecked

A Little Princess

The Mighty Ducks

D2: The Mighty Ducks

D3: The Mighty Ducks

The NeverEnding Story

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

E.T.

Angels in the Outfield

A Cry in the Wild

Westerns

The Man from Snowy River

Return to Snowy River

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

El Dorado

True Grit

The Magnificent Seven

Shane

McLintock!

Broken Lance

The Rare Breed

The Sons of Katie Elder

The Man from Utah

‘Neath Arizona Skies

Riders of Destiny

Overland Stage Raiders

Gunsmoke Collector’s Edition – Matt Gets It, Tap Day for Kitty, Hack Prine, and The Killer

The Alamo

Old Movies

Hatari!

The Ten Commandments

Ben-Hur

Quo Vadis

El Cid

The Bible

Across the Great Divide

Musicals / Shows

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

The Sound of Music

White Christmas

Riverdance

Brigadoon

Oliver!

Annie

Christian Movies

Gingerbrook Fare – Obedience

Colby’s Missing Memory

The Donut Hole – Jesus Shows Us God’s Love

Kid’s Praise! 4 – Singsational Servants!

Kids’ Praise! 5 – Psalty’s Camping Adventure

Gerbert – The World Around Us

Gerbert – Created for Good Works

Sunday Sing-a-Long Video (Maranatha! Kids)

The ButterCream Gang

The ButterCream Gang in Secret of Treasure Mountain

Children’s Bible Story of Jesus – The Resurrection

Children’s Heroes of the Bible – Joseph & his Coat of Many Colors

The Greatest Adventure – The Miracles of Jesus

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Books from My Childhood Part 1

Books from my Childhood Part 1 1-31-13

I love reading and writing, and being read to is no exception.  The following list are picture books from my childhood, books that I read, or books that were read to me, as a toddler or little kid.  bounce  Part 2 will be about book series.

El Blanco: The Legend of the White Stallion by Rutherford Montgomery

Christian Mother Goose Tales by Marjorie Ainsborough Decker

If You Give A Mouse A Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff, illustrated by Felicia Bond

I’ll Always Love You by Hans Wilhelm

The Little Lamb by Judy Dunn

Rhubarb by Stephen Cosgrove, illustrated by Robin James

Gossamer by Stephen Cosgrove, illustrated by Wendy Edelson

Exploring the Titanic by Robert D. Ballard

Little Peep by Jack Kent

The Tale of Three Trees by Angela Elwell Hunt, illustrated by Tim Jonke

Village Tales (Firefly the Foal, Geronimo Grub, Twinette the Spider, and Tuppence and Tiffany) retold by Pat Wynnejones, illustrated by Sheila Ratcliffe

Hedgerow Tales (Benjamin Bee, Charlotte the Caterpillar, Jeremy Cricket, and Robin Redbreast) retold by Pat Wynnejones, illustrated by Sandra Fernandez

Kirby Koala – I’m Thankful For… by Ruth Silverstein, illustrated by Norma Garris

Pandy and the Little Bird by Oda Taro

It’s Groundhog Day! by Steven Kroll, illustrated by Jeni Bassett

Toothbrush the Dog by Bonnie Wilkerson

The Lord Is My Shepherd (The Twenty-Third Psalm) illustrated by Tasha Tudor

Who Lives Here? (Animals of the Pond, Forest, Prairie, Desert, Mountains, Meadow, and Swamp) by Dot and Sy Barlowe

Dusty D. Dawg Has Feelings, Too! by Nancy McConnell, illustrated by Bill Stroble

Animal Babies by Harry McNaught

Baby Animals by Harry McNaught

Richard Scarry’s Please and Thank You Book

Richard Scarry’s Best Storybook Ever

Richard Scarry’s Bedtime Stories

Sarah Morton’s Day (A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Girl) by Kate Waters

Things I Miss About Childhood

Things I Miss About Childhood 1-20-13

Getting a sticker when I went to the dentist, Sam’s, Wal-Mart, or Current.

Spending the whole day on the trampoline.

Being small enough to ride in that seat on the back of someone’s bike.

Not having to know the directions.

Getting a balloon when I went to kid-friendly restaurants.

Always knowing my order – chicken and fries!

Not worrying about anything past that day.

Shoveling the neighbor lady’s driveway and getting Christmas candy for it.

Still being friends with someone even if they disappeared to another state for years, then came back.

Getting “just because” presents from Grandma and Grandpa.

Being covered in dog hair and not caring because I was just thrilled to have a pet.

Having a natural tan because I played outside all summer long.

Not caring how I look.

The free plastic cup that came with kids meals at restaurants.

Making instant friends at McDonald’s and everywhere else.

Birthday parties, cake and ice cream, party favor bags!

Getting people’s unwanted little pets because they were moving.

Jumping off the swings.

The neighbor guy paying me to walk his dog which I would have ecstatically done for free.

The Sledding Hill

I remember being woken up in the middle of the night, when it snowed.  Everything outside my window would be blue and shimmery.

We’d stumble downstairs and dig into the coat closet underneath the stairs, rummaging around for the basket full of snow clothes.  Snoopy hats and thick gloves that were too big for me…  Several layers of clothes, and hiking boots that were big enough to be my brother’s.  Fuzzy pink earmuffs.  And off we’d go, into the snowy night.

Sometimes it was windy and cold, other times just quiet and still.  Our sleds scraped over the fresh snow behind us.  We’d tied ropes through the front so we could pull them.  Mine was pink and my brother’s was orange.  Snowball, our Samoyed mix dog, would thunder around us, kicking up snow and chasing out sleeping rabbits from under the bushes.

We’d follow dad up the road, past my best friend’s house, and all the way to the main street where we’d fight past our heavy snow clothes and climb onto the wall made of stone and brick.  Then we’d carefully march up and down the steps of the wall, over the big humps of the posts, and on, the frigid air tingling in our noses.  Whoever went first was lucky, because they got to shove off the piles of fresh snow from the fence posts.  Early on, I was so small I had to sit on the posts and spin around to get over them.  When I was older, I could step up onto them, or over them.

Sometimes we could see the stars, but sometimes it was still snowing and there were huge clouds covering everything.  Dad would help us off the wall before we reached the ditch where the cow skeletons were, and we’d start on the long trudge up the sledding hill.  It was all covered in weeds, and even cactus here and there, but it would snow so much, you didn’t really notice.  It took so long to climb up the hill, but when you reached the top, the air was so crisp and you had such a long way to sled down the hill, it was all worth it.

Sometimes I’d be scared, looking straight down that huge hill all the way to the bottom, or be afraid I might slide all the way into the ditch.  But I never did.  Sometimes dad would sit behind me, or push me so I’d go fast.  Sometimes my brother would go with me, and sometimes we would race each other.  Snowball would run along beside us, trying to climb into our sleds on the way down.  We’d laugh and scream and our voices were the only sound in that huge empty field.

It was fun sliding down the hill but took so long and it was so hard climbing all the way back up again.  My boots would slip in the snow and so I would try to walk in dad’s footprints, but they were always too big for me to reach.  But up I’d climb, over and over, until we couldn’t breathe from the cold and our noses were red and our toes were numb.

Then we’d climb back up on the wall and make the trek back home, where Mom would always be waiting for us to tell her how much fun we had sledding, while we drank hot chocolate and tried to warm up.  Then we would finally curl up warm and tight in our beds again and fall asleep, waking up the next morning to a beautiful white world.

Several years later, bulldozers leveled my sledding hill flat and built a school where it should have been.  But every time I drive down that road and look at the wall, I remember walking on it through the snow in the dark, and smile.  I will never forget the sledding hill.